Why Don’t You Just Use a Backpack Man & Hello Greater Sudbury

This is a post from the day before I arrived in the City of Sudbury, and I guess it was the start of the kindness that has started to occur on a more regular basis to me:

When I woke up after a semi-good sleep in that road side picnic/rest stop beside the Trans Canada Hwy, I saw that my cart was in bad shape, with two bolts sheard off at the upper and lower stabilizer bars (below).  I have a small wrapping of duct tape around my fabric repair tube for an emergency, but that amount isn’t going to cut it for this job; moreover, I had many km’s to cover before I arrive in the City of Sudbury where I could get this fixed.

I had three options: 1. Give up, pout, and call someone willing to pickup up my defeated body from the side of the highway; 2. Wait and ask anyone who stops for a large amount of duct tape; 3. Roll the dice: use the small amount I have, and walk on dude. I used a combination of options 2 and 3, but after 20 minutes, no luck.  So I did what I could, and rolled the dice.  Regretably, it came up snake eyes, and it fell apart not even 5 km into the walk!

After a few hours of walking with this crumpled, injured looking mess of alloy tubing, I walked into the parking lot of the Kukagami General Store.  As soon as I arrived, a guy (sorry, but I forgot the name) approached me and thought that my cart was pretty cool: indeed it was.  After talking with him, I showed him the problem with my cart, and he said that he could fix it at his house that was less than a minute away by foot.  Many people I talk with give directions, distances, and times based on one having a car.  I noticed that one minutes down the road can range from 10 minutes to 1 hour down the road, but this time it really was just a minute.

When we arrived at his house, he tied some stainless steel line around the cart to stabilize the wheels, and it worked! (below)  The upper bar was holding on good enough until Sudbury, but I needed bolts.

This was incredible luck and kindness, which just keeps happening lately.  These acts fuel my desire to push on when I hit bad hours/days.

I have made some mistakes along the way while walking, as we all do, but when things break, or schedules are thwarted, there seems to be a lone stranger(s) willing to help me move forward km by km.   Why would a complete stranger help a guy (me) with such a far fetched goal?

While changing socks, I met a cyclist going across Canada who only left  a month or so ago from Vancouver.  I sank.  However, that blister and muscle issue is my excuse for not being as far as him!  I told him my goal, and that this walk seems ridiculous, especially with the pace I have been going in my first month.  His rebuttal: people doing these things is good, and that I should keep going!

I ended the day by camping in a forest along road.  After I hung my line in a tree, which took some time, I took a break.  Big mistake.  After I finished my tea, I couldn’t find the location again, eventhough I marked it with my GPS unit.  I know to never leave anything as is in the forest unless it is flagged well!  The forest is a black whole for all things.  After some thought, I clamoured up the back of nearby Subway road sign, and hung the bag off a nail.  The bag was on the far corner close to the forest, so no one should see it.

It was a tiring day, and I must now also get cordellette in Sudbury!  Tomorrow will be a long day on foot, and hopefully I don’t have to get a motel room.

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